Professor Yonca Aydın AkovaProfessor Yonca Aydın Akova Ophthalmologist and Eye Surgeon

Adenoviral Conjuntivitis

Adenoviral Conjuntivitis

Adenoviral conjunctivitis, also known as viral conjunctivitis, is an inflammation of the conjunctiva (the clear, thin tissue that covers the white part of the eye and the inside of the eyelids) caused by a viral infection.

The causative agent is the adenovirus, which is a type of virus that can also cause respiratory infections, such as the common cold.

Adenoviral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread easily from person to person through hand-to-eye contact or by touching contaminated objects, such as towels or eye makeup.

Symptoms of adenoviral conjunctivitis

Symptoms and findings of adenoviral conjunctivitis may range from mild to severe, and may last for several days to several weeks, depending on the severity of the infection and the individual's immune response. In some cases, symptoms may resolve on their own, while in others, they may persist despite treatment.

The most common symptoms of adenoviral conjunctivitis include:

  1. Redness: One or both eyes may become red and inflamed.
  2. Itching or burning sensations in the eyes.
  3. Discharge: A thick, white, or yellow discharge and tearing.
  4. Pain: The eyes may be painful.
  5. Swelling: The eyelids may become swollen, especially in the morning.
  6. Light sensitivity: The eyes may be more sensitive to light than usual.
  7. Blurred vision: In some cases, blurred vision may occur as a result of corneal (the transparent part of the eye) involvement.
  8. Swollen lymph nodes near the affected eye.

In most cases, adenoviral conjunctivitis will resolve on its own within 7 to 10 days. However, in severe cases, antiviral medication or antibiotic eye drops may be prescribed to help relieve symptoms and speed up recovery.

If you are experiencing symptoms of adenoviral conjunctivitis, it is important to see an ophthalmologist for a proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Early treatment can help to prevent more serious complications, such as corneal damage or vision loss.

Complications in severe cases

In some cases, adenoviral conjunctivitis can lead to corneal complications, including:

  • Superficial punctate keratitis (SPK): Tiny, superficial (surface) abrasions on the cornea, which can cause pain, redness, and blurred vision.
  • Corneal infiltrates: This can cause pain, redness, and blurred vision.
  • Corneal scarring: Permanent damage to the cornea, which may cause vision loss.

It is important to seek prompt medical attention if you are experiencing symptoms of corneal complications, as prompt treatment can help to prevent more serious complications and preserve vision.

Adenoviral Conjuntivitis Preventive Measures

Adenoviral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread easily from person to person. To prevent the spread of the virus, it is important to follow these preventive measures:

  1. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water.
  2. Avoid touching your eyes.
  3. Avoid sharing personal items, such as towels, eye drops, and eye makeup, with others.
  4. Avoid close contact with people who have adenoviral conjunctivitis.
  5. Clean and disinfect any objects or surfaces that may have been contaminated with the virus, such as doorknobs, light switches, and computer keyboards.
  6. Dispose of any disposable items, such as tissues and eye drops, that may have come into contact with the virus.
  7. If you have adenoviral conjunctivitis, avoid contact with others until the infection has cleared.

If you are experiencing symptoms of adenoviral conjunctivitis, it is important to see an ophthalmologist for a proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Early treatment can help to prevent more serious complications and reduce the risk of spreading the virus to others.

Adenoviral Conjuntivitis Treatment

Adenoviral conjunctivitis is usually self-limiting, meaning it will resolve on its own without treatment. However, there are some treatments that can help to alleviate symptoms, reduce the frequency of complications and prevent the spread of the virus to others. These treatments include:

  • Artificial tears: Artificial tears can help to soothe and moisturize the eyes, reducing discomfort and redness.
  • Warm compresses: Placing a warm compress over the eyes can help to soothe the eyes and reduce swelling.
  • Antiviral eye gels: Antiviral gels may be prescribed to help speed up the healing process and reduce the risk of complications.
  • Antibiotic eye drops: Antibiotic eye drops may be prescribed to help prevent secondary bacterial infections.
  • Povidone iodine eye drops may also be prescribed.

In severe cases, or if the infection does not resolve on its own, additional treatments may be necessary, such as corticosteroids or immunomodulatory therapy. It is important to seek prompt medical attention if your symptoms are severe or if they persist despite treatment, in order to prevent more serious complications.

Visual loss

Adenoviral conjunctivitis may sometimes lead to visual loss, although this is relatively rare. Visual loss can occur as a result of corneal complications, such as corneal opacities or as a result of anterior keratouveitis, a form of inflammation in the front part of the eye.

In some cases, visual loss can be temporary and can improve with appropriate treatment. However, in severe cases, visual loss can be permanent and may require more aggressive treatments.

It is important to seek prompt medical attention if you experience any changes in your vision or if your symptoms are severe, in order to prevent more serious complications and protect your vision. Your ophthalmologist will be able to diagnose the underlying cause of your visual loss and recommend the appropriate treatment to help restore your vision.

Update Date: 20.11.2023
Professor Yonca Aydın Akova, M.D. FEBO
Editor
Professor Yonca Aydın Akova
Ophthalmologist and Eye Surgeon
The content of the page is for informational purposes only.
Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.
Professor Yonca Aydın AkovaQuestion and Appointment Form
Press
CONTRACTED INSTITUTIONS
Professor Yonca Aydın Akova, M.D. FEBOPROFESSOR YONCA AYDIN AKOVAOphthalmologist and Eye Surgeon
Cataract, Cornea, Glaucoma Surgery
0312 557 90000505 172 1717